Category Archives: FreeBSD/amd64

Anything related to the FreeBSD/amd64 platform.

Boot menu changes in base/head r325694

Update 2017-11-13
r325743 corrected the mistakes. The below no longer applies. Remove /boot/loader.rc.local if you created it.


/boot/loader.rc used to be copied from base/head/sys/boot/i386/loader/loader.rc on FreeBSD/amd64. With r325694 this changed to base/head/sys/boot/forth/loader.rc. Nothing was added to base/head/UPDATING, explaining this change.

As instructed in /boot/loader.rc, to regain our beloved boot menu, we must create and edit /boot/loader.rc.local, essentially redoing what was handled by the previous /boot/loader.rc.

start
check-password
include /boot/beastie.4th
beastie-start

portupgrade uninstall error, broken pipe

I too was bitten by the portupgrade uninstall error, due to broken pipes, on my laptop running FreeBSD/amd64 stable/10. Others have identified the file 5.26 utility as the culprit, introduced in stable/10 as r298920.

Watch PR 209211 for any progress. base/head was corrected at r299234, and stable/10 will follow soon. Continue reading portupgrade uninstall error, broken pipe

Memory leaks in recent stable/10 kernel

All FreeBSD systems under my care got upgraded last Friday to fix some NTP bugs. That upgrade introduced a new bug in the kernel. The bug first appeared at r298004 in base/head, and later at r298134 in base/stable/10. The i386-based systems were more notably affected than the amd64-based systems, as the former typically has less memory than the latter. Continue reading Memory leaks in recent stable/10 kernel

Replacing drives on AMANDA server

I spent some days last week converting our 32-bit AMANDA server to a 64-bit counterpart using spare but aged hardware. The former AMANDA server ran on very aged hardware in comparison. Going 64-bit also ment turning to ZFS-based storage.

Today, I replaced the two 320 GB first generation SATA drives with two 1 TB third generation SATA drives. The new drives, like their predecessors, are connected to the second generation SATA controller on the motherboard. Replacing the drives is nevertheless an improvement. Continue reading Replacing drives on AMANDA server

FreeBSD’s UEFI boot loader now supports ZFS pools

As of r294999 it’s possible to boot FreeBSD/amd64 stable/10 from ZFS pools on systems running UEFI firmware. Up until now I have booted my UEFI ZFS laptop using the older boot1.efi boot loader with /boot located on a UFS partition. Earlier today I updated my EFI System Partition (ESP), put /boot back where it belongs, in the ZFS pool, and scrapped the UFS partition. Thanks to everyone who made this happen.

Ascertaining installed ports for a specific architecture

When upgrading from one major version of FreeBSD to another, in my case from FreeBSD/amd64 stable/9 to FreeBSD/amd64 stable/10, it’s customary to upgrade the installed ports afterwards, beginning with ports-mgmt/pkg.

I forcefully upgraded all installed ports using portupgrade -afpv, but the upgrade of lang/ruby21 failed miserably.

I removed all traces of Ruby 2.1, i.e. ports-mgmt/portupgrade and databases/ruby-bdb, before manually compiling and installing lang/ruby21, databases/ruby-bdb, and ports-mgmt/portupgrade using the ports collection.

Now, I needed to know which remaining ports were still compiled for stable/9. The following snippet allowed me to gather the origins of such ports:

pkg query -a %o:%q | grep freebsd:9: | cut -d : -f 1

Now, I could feed that list to the newly installed portupgrade and upgrade the remaining ports:

portupgrade -fprv `pkg query -a %o:%q | grep freebsd:9: | cut -d : -f 1`

In the end, I should have removed lang/ruby21 completely after upgrading ports-mgmt/pkg, and reinstalled ports-mgmt/portupgrade manually using the ports collection. Only then is it safe to forcefully rebuild and reinstall all the other ports. Don’t forget to add devel/cvs if you used to rely on cvs in base, and adjust all references from /usr/bin/cvs to /usr/local/bin/cvs.

UEFI, GPT, Windows 10, FreeBSD 10, and rEFInd

Over the last few days have I experimented with UEFI and GPT in VirtualBox 4.3.26. The goal was to multiboot various operating system, in this case Windows 10 Enterprise Technical Preview 9926 x64 and FreeBSD/amd64 stable/10.

First, I thought of persuading the UEFI firmware to always present its boot menu. It sure beats remembering to press F12 each time I want to boot a different operating system. This proved impossible for a number of reasons.

Next, I came across The rEFInd Boot Manager. After a quick glance I saw this is exactly what I want, a UEFI boot manager. Continue reading UEFI, GPT, Windows 10, FreeBSD 10, and rEFInd