Connecting to guest-access allowed, readonly Samba shares

Sometimes security is on the border of being ridiculous. Modern Windows 10 is very anxious when connecting to guest-access allowed, readonly Samba shares, Here’s how to allow “insecure” guest logons for stand-alone computers. The same is true when configuring a GPO.

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4046019/guest-access-smb2-disabled-by-default-in-windows-10-server-2016.

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\LanmanWorkstation\Parameters]
"AllowInsecureGuestAuth"=dword:00000001


efi_max_resolution needed on base/head for UEFI systems without FHD displays

r331464 added efi_max_resolution. If you run base/head on monitors without Full HD (FHD), then you might need to specify your desired resolution in /boot/loader.conf.

This should suffice for a resolution of 1280×1024 on 19 inches displays.

efi_max_resolution="1280x1024"

Kernel panic due to memory corruption

This is what a kernel panic may look like when facing memory corruption.

kernel: panic: solaris assert: arc_buf_alloc_impl(hdr, private, compressed_read, 1, &buf) == 0 (0x5 == 0x0), file: /usr/src/sys/cddl/contrib/opensolaris/uts/common/fs/zfs/arc.c, line: 5318
kernel: cpuid = 1
kernel: KDB: stack backtrace:
kernel: db_trace_self_wrapper() at 0xffffffff8046b52b = db_trace_self_wrapper+0x2b/frame 0xfffffe0122681380
kernel: vpanic() at 0xffffffff806c5ba6 = vpanic+0x186/frame 0xfffffe0122681400
kernel: panic() at 0xffffffff806c5a13 = panic+0x43/frame 0xfffffe0122681460
kernel: assfail3() at 0xffffffff8030987c = assfail3+0x2c/frame 0xfffffe0122681480
kernel: arc_read() at 0xffffffff80322ddc = arc_read+0x83c/frame 0xfffffe0122681510
kernel: dbuf_read() at 0xffffffff8032e918 = dbuf_read+0x678/frame 0xfffffe01226815c0
kernel: dmu_buf_hold_array_by_dnode() at 0xffffffff80338bf3 = dmu_buf_hold_array_by_dnode+0x203/frame 0xfffffe0122681630
kernel: dmu_read_uio_dnode() at 0xffffffff8033a167 = dmu_read_uio_dnode+0x37/frame 0xfffffe01226816a0
kernel: dmu_read_uio_dbuf() at 0xffffffff8033a10b = dmu_read_uio_dbuf+0x3b/frame 0xfffffe01226816d0
kernel: zfs_freebsd_read() at 0xffffffff803d7e80 = zfs_freebsd_read+0x660/frame 0xfffffe0122681780
kernel: VOP_READ_APV() at 0xffffffff80a7b77c = VOP_READ_APV+0x7c/frame 0xfffffe01226817b0
kernel: vn_read() at 0xffffffff807a0815 = vn_read+0x195/frame 0xfffffe0122681830
kernel: vn_io_fault1() at 0xffffffff8079e4e9 = vn_io_fault1+0x169/frame 0xfffffe0122681970
kernel: vn_io_fault() at 0xffffffff8079c6ac = vn_io_fault+0x18c/frame 0xfffffe01226819e0
kernel: dofileread() at 0xffffffff807291aa = dofileread+0xba/frame 0xfffffe0122681a20
kernel: kern_readv() at 0xffffffff80728db8 = kern_readv+0x68/frame 0xfffffe0122681a70
kernel: sys_read() at 0xffffffff80728d46 = sys_read+0x86/frame 0xfffffe0122681ac0
kernel: amd64_syscall() at 0xffffffff809d5f18 = amd64_syscall+0xa38/frame 0xfffffe0122681bf0
kernel: fast_syscall_common() at 

Upgrading XenServer 7.1 to 7.3 via 7.2

It’s winter break, giving me time to bring systems down for their much needed maintenance. One of my tasks was to upgrade our XenServers. They’re not joined to the same pool for historical reasons. One of them is close to 8 years old, the other one is fairly new. For the first server I chose to reboot into the hypervisor after upgrading to 7.2, before upgrading to 7.3. A wise choice. Just for the fun of it, I chose not to reboot into the hypervisor on the second server between 7.2 and 7.3. This left me with the choice of restoring the old 7.1 version or performing a clean reinstall of 7.3. Neither option was inviting, so I had to reboot into the hypervisor prior to upgrading to 7.3. Lesson learned.


The irony of this story is that XenServer 7.4 was released two days ago. Luckily, I can use the new update feature and save me a trip to the server room.

Client for OES 2 SP4 IR7a on Windows 10 1709

While trying to log in on our Novell servers using Client for OES 2 SP4 IR7a on Windows 10 1709, I was greeted with:

A required network service has not started.
Please check your error log for details.

The third reply of this post gave me a clue, simply run setup.exe one more time and reboot.

Uninstallation of IR7a still gives me error 0x80070005. The Registry settings in HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Novell was accessible to me as a regular user. Maybe the client’s uninstaller is complaining about rights in the filesystem.

iobit‘s uninstaller free saved the day.

I really wish for more specific error messages.


Addendum 2018-02-23

Running setup.exe or yourscript.cmd from an elevated Command Prompt window eliminated all my problems. Search for “Command Prompt” on the start menu and hold down Ctrl+Shift when you click on the menu item. Simply right-clicking on yourscript.cmd and selecting “Run as administrator” proved to be insufficient. Creating HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Novell manually might also set things straight.

pkg add chokes on apparantly wrong OS version

I’m experimenting further with ports-mgmt/synth. I let synth create some packages for me and I then removed all installed packages, save the pkg package manager.

What a surprise I got when attempting to add my own metaport! Continue reading pkg add chokes on apparantly wrong OS version

IPv6 RDNSS and DNSSL on Cisco IOS XE

The official documentation on Cisco IOS XE for Catalyst 4500E claims this is the syntax for specifying IPv6 RDNSS and DNSSL:

Switch(config)# interface Te1/1
Switch(config‑if)# ipv6 nd ra dns server 4::4
Switch(config‑if)# ipv6 nd ra dns search list aaa.cc.com

Using IOS XE 3.10.0E, the correct syntax for DNSSL is:

Switch(config)# interface Te1/1
Switch(config‑if)# ipv6 nd ra dns server 4::4
Switch(config‑if)# ipv6 nd ra dns‑search‑list domain aaa.cc.com

Sadly, the quality of Cisco’s documentation isn’t what it was back in 2006.