Category Archives: Microsoft Windows 7

Anything related to Microsoft Windows 7, regardless of shape and size

KB2977759 and KB2952664 now available in WSUS

A couple of KBs, KB2977759 and KB2952664, related to the dreadful Appraiser stuff, appeared in our WSUS instance this week. The former just made it on my list of KBs one should avoid. Both was promptly declined.

The list encompasses:

  • KB2952664, Compatibility update for upgrading Windows 7
  • KB2977759, Compatibility update for Windows 7 RTM
  • KB3022345, Update for customer experience and diagnostic telemetry (superseded by KB3068708, see below)
  • KB3035583, Update installs Get Windows 10 app in Windows 8.1 and Windows 7 SP1
  • KB3068708, Update for customer experience and diagnostic telemetry
  • KB3075249, Update that adds telemetry points to consent.exe in Windows 8.1 and Windows 7
  • KB3080149, Update for customer experience and diagnostic telemetry
  • KB3123862, Updated capabilities to upgrade Windows 8.1 and Windows 7

Another bad KB? KB3123862

Earlier this week Microsoft released another batch of Windows updates. Among them are KB3123862. As usual, the title displayed by Windows Update gives no clue to what this update actually does: “Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB3123862)”. Clicking on the More information link reveal the following:

Updated capabilities to upgrade Windows 8.1 and Windows 7

This update adds capabilities to some computers that lets users easily learn about Windows 10 or start an upgrade to Windows 10.

“Easily learn about Windows 10”? “Start an upgrade to Windows 10”? I have an experimental laptop at work where I learn all I can about Windows 10 and the applications we use at work. That’s all I need at the moment.

No, thank you. I don’t want to install Windows 10 until I’m willing. Needless to say, this update was never installed on my Windows 7 computer at home, and the update was promptly hidden.

I feel really sorry for the computer illiterate. How are they supposed to know what’s good or bad for them?

The list of bad KBs when it comes to Windows 10 and its intrusiveness is expanded to cover:

  • KB2952664, Compatibility update for upgrading Windows 7
  • KB3022345, Update for customer experience and diagnostic telemetry (superseded by KB3068708, see below)
  • KB3035583, Update installs Get Windows 10 app in Windows 8.1 and Windows 7 SP1
  • KB3068708, Update for customer experience and diagnostic telemetry
  • KB3075249, Update that adds telemetry points to consent.exe in Windows 8.1 and Windows 7
  • KB3080149, Update for customer experience and diagnostic telemetry
  • KB3123862, Updated capabilities to upgrade Windows 8.1 and Windows 7

KB3035583

Microsoft is pretty sneaky. They camouflage their Windows 10 downloader, KB3035583, as a recommended Windows 7 update with no indication of what good this update does. Only by clicking on the first link is its true intention revealed.

Norwegian description of KB3035583, sadly with no indication of what the update actually does
Norwegian description of KB3035583, sadly with no indication of what the update actually does

As a contrast, the dreaded KB976002 browser choice update was well marked with its intention even in its (long winded) title. Luckily, we don’t see that update anymore.

Dell Latitude E7240 and Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 7260

Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 7260 fails to notify Windows 7 when the SSID changes. The result is that the wireless interface retains the previous and possibly invalid IP addresses and other settings. The latest driver, A11, only a few days old, isn’t helpful at all.

I usually avoid installing Intel’s own utility for managing wireless connections, as I feel this should be left in the capable hands of the operating system and the driver. Maybe I should think twice about that.

The current solution is to manually force Windows into releasing and renewing the IP addresses after switching to a different SSID.

@echo off

ipconfig /release
ipconfig /release6

ipconfig /renew
ipconfig /renew6

Long-running Windows 7 SP1, Cisco VPN Client 5.0.07.0440, and “Reason 414: Failed to establish a TCP connection”

I’ve noticed that Cisco VPN Client 5.0.07.0440 tends to fail with “Reason 414: Failed to establish a TCP connection.” on long-running Windows 7 SP1. It’s been going on for years. Continue reading Long-running Windows 7 SP1, Cisco VPN Client 5.0.07.0440, and “Reason 414: Failed to establish a TCP connection”

Relocating the Client-side Caching database in Windows 7 and 8

Sometimes the default location of the Client-side Caching database is just plain unsuitable. Client-side Caching, or CSC, is used for storing offline files, local copies of files normally stored on Windows shares, stored on Windows servers. (The Norwegian term is «frakoblede filer».)

The default location for the CSC database is C:\Windows\CSC. If you like to keep the OS and the software separate from any user data, or want to store the CSC database on a dedicated local partition, then it might be useful to change the location to, e.g. D:\CSC. Continue reading Relocating the Client-side Caching database in Windows 7 and 8